Cats With GPS Trackers Show Their Nightly Escapades

June 6, 2016

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These are several satellite images with the data from cat-worn GPS trackers overlayed to show the nightly adventures of different cats living in Australia. The project was created by an Australian government organization to bring light to just how much cats roam at night, and the trouble they can cause local wildlife. My cat? My cat causes all kinds of trouble. "That's a coyote." That does explain trying to eat the neighbor's dog.

In Australia cats are considered invasive species and can have devastating effects on the native wildlife. Often cats' owners are convinced that their pets don't roam around at night, so the aim of this project is to show them what's really going on.

It looks like most cats explore directly around their home for a little bit, then make one or two journeys significantly further away. Are you thinking what I'm thinking? "Booty calls." Exactly. Fun fact: did you know the original feud between dogs and cats started because doggystyle was originally called cattystyle but dogs stole it and popularized it? That is 100% true and the next time you're doing it doggystyle I want you to think about that. I'm lying, I want you to think about me.

Keep going for several more maps.

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Thanks to Gregory M, who put a GPS tracker on his indoor cat with much less surprising results.

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