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Results for "paleontology"

  • May 19, 2014
    This is a fossilized femur from a new dinosaur species discovered in Argentina that might be the world's largest. Believed to be a new species of Titanosaur (a sauropod, like Brontosaurus), the beast could have reached 40-meters (~130 feet) in length, 20-meters (~65 feet, or 7... / Continue →
  • March 13, 2014
    Meet Nanuqsaurus, a miniature cousin of the t-rex that roamed northern Alaska some 70-million years ago. Roaming northern Alaska now? SASQUATCH. While this has been called a dwarf or pygmy in some quarters, it is hardly small with an estimated size of around 5 m in total le... / Continue →
  • November 7, 2013
    In news even sexier than a Pandora for p0rn, a new tyrannosaur species has been discovered in Utah. Lythronax argestes ("king of gore") lived some 10-12 million years before Tyrannosaurus Rex, and may have been the t-rex's "great uncle". My great uncle? No clue, he's been in... / Continue →
  • September 27, 2013
    Seen here looking like a cross between a shark, killer whale, cowboy boot and a sea turtle with an unfortunate chin penis, is an artist's impression of Entelognathus, an ancient fish paleontologists believe may be the missing link between the extinct bony armored Placoderms and... / Continue →
  • July 16, 2013
    In recent years there have been some pretty defamatory claims that the t-rex was just a scavenger and didn't hunt other live dinos. But now, thanks to a t-rex tooth found lodged in the tailbone of a duck-billed dinosaur that clearly lived for some time after the encounter, pal... / Continue →
  • January 4, 2013
    According to a recent paleontology report, birdlike dinosaurs of the genus Oviraptor may have shook their ass feathers like some modern-day birds do to attract mates. *comes running* Thanks for the show guys, but really -- the feather shaking wasn't necessary. Studying ovira... / Continue →
  • December 27, 2012
    Because scientists are quickly running out of important things to think about, Montana State University paleontology professor David Varricchio has been pondering what species of dinosaur might provide the best-tasting meat. You're sick! We shouldn't be cloning dinosaurs just... / Continue →
  • April 5, 2012
    According to a recent study of immaculately preserved dino remains, a group of paleontologists from the Chinese Academy of Sciences in Beijing have determined that Yutyrannus huali ('beautiful feathered tyrant'), a relative of the t-rex that only grew to about 1/5 the weight, w... / Continue →
  • March 13, 2012
    Seen here having a great time hunting dragonflies (WTF guys -- how about inviting me next time?!), two recently discovered species of horned dinosaurs related to the triceratops are set to be unveiled at The Cleveland Museum of Natural History. Plus they're just weensy little ... / Continue →
  • February 24, 2012
    Paleontologists at Drexel University have developed a means of scanning fossilized dinos, then printing accurate reproductions of their bones to assemble into accurately-moving robotic dinosaurs. No word if they plan on adding skin to them, but I'm not into the bony look. Am ... / Continue →
  • October 16, 2011
    This is the most complete dinosaur skeleton found to date, with a whopping 98% of its bones preserved. In comparison, the most complete t-rex ever found is only 80% complete. Well, 75% after the museum discovers the theft. You think I don't spoon a dino bone to sleep every n... / Continue →
  • September 16, 2011
    Paleontologists in Canada have discovered a treasure trove of dinosaur feathers (I know -- it's still hard for me to believe too) trapped in amber that should shed some light on the evolution of feathered animals, and, God unwilling but let's totally do it anyways, the potentia... / Continue →