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Results for "microscope"

  • August 1, 2012
    This is a microscopic shot of a bunch of miniature people getting all freaky-deaky on the surface of a semiconductor. *popping popcorn* Man, this is even hotter than a peep show! Of course, there is some chance, albeit small, that they aren't nudists but rather just the po... / Continue →
  • December 7, 2011
    Inb4 my sperm would've won. The world's first cellular race was recently held in France, and I think I speak for everyone here when I say nobody cared. I mean, were they even accepting bets? Because I've got an angry bookie who's gonna make my legs bend backwards if I can't ... / Continue →
  • July 22, 2011
    Just kidding, it's not really a chestburster. It's a deep-sea hydrothermal worm. And it's not really that big. Actually, it's tiny. Probably about the size of your wiener. Taken using an FEI Quanta SEM, this image is amazingly zoomed in 525 times. The real width of the fie... / Continue →
  • July 14, 2011
    These are grains of sand magnified 250x. I have no clue if representative of typical grains of sand like you'd find stuck to a dog turd at the beach, or if they had to pick through a bunch on a magic beach to find some really good ones. In reality, most sand probably looks pr... / Continue →
  • March 2, 2011
    I don't really keep up on microscope technology because I only use mine to look at breakfast cereal and bits of weed, but apparently there's been a breakthough in optics that allows an actual glimpse of objects on the nanometer scale (versus scanning electron microscopy, etc.).... / Continue →
  • October 7, 2010
    This is a 3.5-micron Pac-Man. How big is a micron? At least twice as long as yourcron! *zing!* Nano PacMan made of copper oxide Scanning electron microscope image of a copper oxide cluster, 3.5 microns in diameter, prepared by evaporation and condensation over an alumina ... / Continue →
  • September 2, 2010
    In photo: Julia heliconian butterfly egg, top, zebra longwing butterfly egg, bottom. In other impressive photographic news, these are insect eggs as photographed using a scanning electron microscope. Ooh ooh -- do the stuff under my fingernails next. I've always wanted to se... / Continue →
  • June 17, 2010
    This is a series of photographs taken of alcoholic beverages under a microscope. This is tequila, but there are several more of my favorites after the jump. Now I don't know about you, but I'd drink every single one of them. And eat the microscope slides. This one tastes li... / Continue →
  • December 16, 2009
    I'm sure you already knew that no two snowflakes are alike, but did you know most women's breasts are different sizes too? I know, I can't believe it either! Anyway, this is a chart used to classify which shape category a snowflake falls into. I posted a bunch for reference ... / Continue →
  • August 18, 2009
    Hey guys I'm getting kicked out my hotel (which is fine because it's a shithole and caught fire yesterday) so I have to relocate. I'll be back this afternoon with more posts though, I promise. In the meantime, here's a $130 USB powered microscope. This week e-Supply Japan ... / Continue →
  • May 26, 2009
    The Rosetta Disk is a 3" nickel disk that has been etched with over 13,500 pages of information on how to read and understand the world's languages in case aliens get tired of sticking things up our butts and want to get their learn on. It represents over 1,500 languages and r... / Continue →
  • July 1, 2008
    After posting yesterday's Plush Particles I got several tips asking to post the microbe versions, so here they are. They've been around for a while so you may have seen them already, and if so let me know before I sleep with you because I don't want to catch any of them. Each... / Continue →
  • June 2, 2008
    Scientists in Japan recently made the world's smallest ramen bowl, with a diameter of only 1/25,000 of an inch. Which, in scientific terminology, makes it invisible except to superheros that got shafted in the cool powers department (unless they can also see through walls, in ... / Continue →
  • March 11, 2008
    Dr. Anirban Bandyopadhyah, of the National Institute of Materials Science in Tsukuba, Japan, has developed a chemical "brain" capable of controlling nanobots. This "brain", soon to be known by the few remaining humans not killed in the machine uprising as "Mother Brain" will c... / Continue →