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Results for "machines"

  • December 11, 2014
    These are two videos showcasing numerous designs of perpetual motion machines throughout history. They were all fascinating to watch, particularly the ones in the second video (featuring more modern machines). Unfortunately, perpetual motion machines are impossible to develop... / Continue →
  • April 14, 2014
    This is the paper airplane folding and launching machine that a group of engineers built. I could probably watch it all day. Also: sleep and play video games. And if one of these f***ing lotto scratchers would finally hit the jackpot, maybe I could. But nooooooo, apparently... / Continue →
  • December 11, 2013
    Not these balls mind you -- they would take a forklift! Jk jk, but at least a brown grocery bag. This is the incredible ball-moving machine built by Kawaguchi Akiyuki. Each section is an individual module (often designed by other ball-moving aficionados) that moves the lit... / Continue →
  • February 28, 2013
    This is a video from OREO of physicist David Neevel demonstrating the Rube Goldberg looking machine he built to remove the creme from OREOs because he only likes the cookie part. WTF? Who doesn't like the creme? I'd buy triple-stuffed OREOs if they sold them but they don't s... / Continue →
  • July 31, 2008
    This is a video of an all wooden machine made by a 70-year old man named Del who may or may not be Santa Claus. It contains absolutely no metal whatsoever and displays virtually ever method of mechanical motion, all in a single machine. Sure it doesn't actually do anything, b... / Continue →
  • May 19, 2008
    This is a video of some guy undressing a chick with a mechanical digger. I'm petitioning to make it an Olympic sport. It was apparently on some Italian variety show and at first I thought they were using a mannequin. But they're definitely not, it's a real chick (hence the l... / Continue →
  • March 11, 2008
    Dr. Anirban Bandyopadhyah, of the National Institute of Materials Science in Tsukuba, Japan, has developed a chemical "brain" capable of controlling nanobots. This "brain", soon to be known by the few remaining humans not killed in the machine uprising as "Mother Brain" will c... / Continue →