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That Was Quick: New 30-Second Cell Phone Charger

30-second-phone-charger.jpg

A new tech start-up claims they've developed a cell phone charger that can fully charge a phone in 30-seconds. For reference, that is 29-seconds slower than the cell phone charger I'm developing with the help of alien technology. "GW? Why is there a curly phone cord poking out of your butt?" Relax, it's all part of the process.

StoreDot was born out of the nanotechnology department at Tel Aviv University and developed its prototype for Samsung's Galaxy 4. It unveiled the device at Microsoft's Think Next conference in Tel Aviv. StoreDot says it plans to make chargers for other smartphones, too.


StoreDot has been developing biological semiconductors, made from naturally occurring organic compounds called peptides, or short chains of amino acids, the building blocks of proteins. The technology can be used, among other things, to speed charging times, the company says.

Heck yeah, phones are gonna be exploding left and right. You wanna charge your phone quickly? Here's what you do: okay, I don't actually know. I heard turning it off or in airplane mode helps though. Or you can get a pager and only have to replace the batteries once every couple months. Technology is cyclical, remember -- pagers are gonna make a comeback. *click click click click* Did you hear that? That was the sound of a million hipsters hitting eBay to be the first of their friends to get one.

Keep going for a video demo, but turn the volume down because for some reason the audio is all interference. Not a good sign for a tech company claiming they can charge a phone in 30-seconds.

Thanks to Thaylor H, who uses the old 'two soup cans and a taut string' method of telecommunication and never has to charge a battery. Heck yeah, call my treehouse!

There are Comments.
  • Knoltel

    Every so often, we hear about new technology that’s supposed to save smartphone battery life. But most of these advances are still in the lab stage, unfit for public demonstration.

    StoreDot is a little
    different. The Tel Aviv-based startup isn’t claiming to increase
    smartphone battery life, but instead says it can charge a dying phone in
    less than a minute. And for the skeptics, StoreDot demonstrated the
    technology on a Samsung Galaxy S4 on Monday during Microsoft’s Think
    Next symposium.

    Keep in mind that StoreDot’s real advances are in the battery, not
    the charger. StoreDot is using a new battery chemistry that features
    “nanodots” derived from bio-organic material. These nanodots are used in
    both the electrode, which stores the battery’s energy, and the
    electrolyte, which transfers energy between the battery’s anode and
    cathode ends. StoreDot says the electrical properties of these nanodots
    allow the electrode to charge much faster, while still discharging at a
    rate similar to conventional lithium-ion batteries. And because the
    technology is based on naturally occurring organic compounds, it’s
    supposedly cheap to produce.

    Although the demo is impressive, it will face some hurdles on the
    road to commercialization. In the current demo, StoreDot’s battery is
    physically larger than the one inside Samsung’s Galaxy S4, but its
    capacity is smaller. So while it can charge much faster, it won’t last
    as long on a charge. StoreDot says it’s working on the capacity issue
    and hopes to reach its goal of matching conventional batteries within a
    year. The charger is much larger as well–though StoreDot says it’s
    working on reducing the size–and it’ll be roughly twice as expensive as a
    normal charger. Finally, the phone itself needs to be modified to
    accommodate a high current during charging, but again, StoreDot says
    it’s hoping that users could eventually drop the battery into existing
    phones.
    There’s also the issue of raising money and mass-producing a product.
    StoreDot says it has a “large Asian smartphone manufacturer” as a
    strategic investor, and the company has recently raised $6 million according to The Next Web. Still, StoreDot isn’t planning to begin mass production until late 2016. As I’ve written before,
    the testing phase for the safety and longevity of new battery
    technology can take a long time, and that’s a big reason so many
    solutions are still years away

    http://time.com/52651/storedot...

    Added by http://newandroidphones-tobuy-...

  • Julius

    But the fastest will drain your battery. I've found some good reviews about Wireless Qi Charger and USB Car Charger in Amazon Store. Here is the link
    http://www.amazon.com/dp/B00EB...

  • George Roussos

    BTW that's a Samsung Galaxy S3 in the video not a 4......duh

  • Will Chamberland

    OH cute they made an app that looks lie your phone is charging in 30 seconds! See! The battery bar is green and looks filled. It MUST be true!

  • Matt

    Interesting... Hopefully it's not just vaporware... I suspect the guys from Tesla would be very interested...

  • Shawn Chong

    30 seconds to fill a phone? That's like saying I have a way for you to digest your food in 30 seconds. Seems far-fetched and looks like a scam.

  • sizzlepants

    Does anyone else find it weird that the video was published the day after the articles and was posted by an account that features nothing else but homemovies?

    Granted I think the clip of the dog eating ice cream is on par with the implied technical innovation presented above, others might disagree.

  • Guest

    StoreDot was born out of the nanotechnology department at Tel Aviv University and developed its prototype for Samsung's Galaxy 4. It unveiled the device at Microsoft's Think Next conference in Tel Aviv. StoreDot says it plans to make chargers for other smartphones, too.

    StoreDot has been developing biological semiconductors, made from naturally occurring organic compounds called peptides, or short chains of amino acids, the building blocks of proteins. The technology can be used, among other things, to speed charging times, the company says.

  • Gingerbread
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