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Universe 80-Million Years Older Than Previously Thought

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According to astronomers studying background radiation data gathered by the Planck Space probe, the universe is 80-million years older than previously thought. So now when somebody asks you how old the universe is, you can confidently tell them, "80-million years older than previously thought" because you never knew the original figure in the first place. WTF are they teaching in school these days?

The Planck space probe looked back at the afterglow of the Big Bang, and those results have now added about 80 million years to the universe's age, putting it at 13.81 billion years old.


The findings released Thursday bolster a key theory called inflation, which says the universe burst from subatomic size to its now-observable expanse in a fraction of a second.

The probe, named for the German physicist Max Planck, the originator of quantum physics, also found that the cosmos is expanding a bit slower than originally thought, has a little less of that mysterious dark energy than astronomers had figured and has a tad more normal matter. But scientists say those are small changes in calculations about the universe, whose numbers are so massive.

Not gonna lie, trying to wrap my head around the scale of the universe and how it was formed and are their infinite universes -- that kind of thinking makes my head hurt. I'm a simply man, you know? Some might argue too simple. Others would probably argue mentally deficient. And you know what I call those people? Friends and family. "Don't forget us." And Geekologie readers.

Thanks to Pyrblaze, who, like me, can't even fathom 13.81-billion years and starts spazzing out whenever the Burger King drive-thru line is takes too long. LIKE IT WAS TODAY.

There are Comments.
  • Closet Nerd

    I married my wife, and then I found out she was 20 years older than she looked
    ..... just sayin

  • Elak Swindell

    The headline for article brings to mind one exclamation: Duh. No matter how much and how long astronomers look, they will continue to find that the universe is older than any preconceived notion of theirs. The universe is fractal in nature. The more you look, the deeper is goes and we can only see so far from our point of view.

  • Idlethoughts

    Nope, not how the big bang works, sorry.

  • Elak Swindell

    Well, how certain are you that the so-called "Big Bang" worked the way you and astronomers believe? There's even a new theory called the "Big Freeze", which is quite interesting in its views and could be theoretically possible. No matter how you look at it, the universe is bigger and older than any possible measurement scientists can calculate from out little place here on Earth.

  • Idlethoughts

    First the evidence of the big bang is mostly from measurements of the cosmic microwave background, measured from extremely precise instruments mostly in outer space, and the universes expansion. Current studies heavily support it as a theory, if your interested feel free to research online. Second the "Big freeze has nothing to do with the beginning of the universe, "The Big Freeze, which is also known as the Heat Death, is one of the possible scenarios predicted by scientists in which the Universe may END." so it really doesn't have to do with this.
    Read more: http://www.universetoday.com/3...

  • David Laverdiere II

    80 million years older? Huh...? The newest estimate I remember seeing before was 13.77 billion years.. why are they saying 13.81ish billion now? I mean I'm fine if they think it's 13.81, but that's not 80 million years older than 13.77 >_>

  • Scott Hall. 61st IWGP Champ.

    That's our universe? Where's the DC Universe, or The Marvel Universe? This universe sucks. It looks too plain and boring.

  • cardstock

    Perhaps it's my lack of understanding, but the idea behind dark matter seems to be, "Hmm, these physics don't really make sense, maybe we're a bit off. Actually never mind, there's just a magical material that we can't see or detect that takes care of the things we can't explain. It's super dark, guys."

  • Almost.
    It's effect on normal matter is detectable, but no one knows what it is.
    http://science.nasa.gov/astrop...

  • jimmy

    Every other site where I read this today had a comment list full of religious nuts.
    I'm glad that this place doesn't! Maybe there's hope for the species after all

  • Correction. . .
    Universe believed to be 80-Million Years Older Than Previously Thought
    ya, and that number will only get bigger and bigger and bigger, btw.

  • Til underverse comes.
    YOU KEEP WHAT YOU KILL!

  • Somebody can't spell atheist.

  • chair soysauce

    This one is my new favorite,

    http://houston.cbslocal.com/20...

    We all know that the biggest threat to the existence of a bird is a car...

  • balashi

    Ahahaha... gotta love science - anytime they need to, they can just arbitrarily change the age of the universe to fit whatever new theories they come up with to replace the old ones that get disproven... love it!

  • Alex Clarke

    What's wrong with adapting what we understand of the universe when we learn something new. This isn't about changing facts to fit new theories, it's about changing theories to fit new facts.

  • Malcolm Reynolds

    Sounds to me like somebody failed basic science courses in elementary school.

  • halfast

    In science, hypotheses are developed and tested. From these tests, data is collected and formed into theories, which are informational models used to explain our best understanding of a particular subject. As new facts are discovered, theories are adjusted to present the most accurate view currently possible. There is nothing "arbitrary" about this process. However, if you have a better method for comprehending the universe, I'm all ears.

  • Idlethoughts

    That thing you described, it's called learning. And luckily it's not something exclusively for science, I suggest you try it.

  • J.c. Hatfield

    So that makes it 80,006,000 years old right?

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