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Scientists: Now With More Ability To Make Movies From What Your Brain Is Thinking

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Mad scientists at the University of California Berkeley are now able to create videos of what your brain "sees" after watching a video IRL using a bunch of complicated-ass computer models. Plus -- PLUS -- videos of Steve Martin with a mustache. Because what would science be without Steve Martin videos? I dunno, but if you think I'm wearing pants under this labcoat you're dead wrong.

Researchers at UC Berkeley used functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI) and some seriously complex computational models to figure out what images our minds create when presented with movie and TV clips. So far, the process is only able to reconstruct the neural equivalents of things people have already seen, but eventually it might be possible to construct the images people see in dreams and memories.


The researchers developed this technique by showing study participants a series of black-and-white photographs while imaging their minds. By comparing the photographs with the scans, they were able to engineer a way to recognize any image from how the brain responded. With that basic principle in place, it was then only a question of building up a sufficiently complex computer model to decode moving, color images like those in the video above.

That's actually pretty wild. There's a video of several examples (including the ones I screencapped in the picture!) after the jump, and I'll be the first to admit I'm glad I wasn't involved in the study. Everything my brain sees looks like privates. You think I can't turn a car into a boob? Please. *licking grill* The grill is the nipple, see?! Mmmm, dragonflies.

Hit the jump for the demo.

Amazing video shows us the actual movies that play inside our mind [io9]

Thanks to Chris, sol, Thaylor and Pesche, who agree some things are best left unseen. Yeah -- FLUSH BEFORE LEAVING THE STALL YOU SICK F***S!

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