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NASA Sending These LEGO Minifigs To Jupiter

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Because LEGO figures like to go on space adventures too, NASA and LEGO have teamed up to send this trio of minifigs to Jupiter aboard the Juno spacecraft, which launches tomorrow. Also aboard the Juno spacecraft: one VERY special stowaway. Get it? I'm a sped and I want off this rock.

The figures, milled from aluminum, will accompany Juno on its five-year trip to Jupiter.


The brick company even underwrote the project, at a cost of $5,000 for each of the minifigs, which will soon become the farthest flying toys ever.

Each figure has been customized to represent his or her special characteristics. Jupiter carries a lightning bolt, Juno has a magnifying glass to represent her search for truth, Galileo is carrying a telescope and a model of the planet Jupiter.

Upon arrival in July 2016, the space probe will collect data on Jupiter, its moons and atmosphere. After orbiting the planet for a year (about 33 orbits) and relaying its data, Juno will purposefully de-orbit and crash into the planet's surface.

$5,000 per figure?! I'm not sure where you're getting your aluminum, LEGO, but around here people pushing shopping carts get it out of your garbage and recycling bins by rooting around in there while you're waiting to pull into your driveway. *getting depressed* F*** I need to move.

Hit the jump for closeups of each fig and a parting shot of them mounted on the probe.

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GeekDad Exclusive: Lego Minifigs Soon Headed for Deep Space [wired]

Thanks to Maloney, who rhymes with bologna, but tastes twice as good. ;)

There are Comments.
  • Qurashi

    new information about jupiter which is very attractive and amazing. we are providingonline assignment help which provide complete information about NASA research on Jupiter.

  • in a thousand years someone is gonna find those and be like "we found statues on Jupiter, proving it once had (very tiny) inhabitants"

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